817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2019. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
Hand-knotted and hand-woven rugs are both made by hand, however, they each employ a unique weaving technique that affects their quality, texture, design complexity and price. (There are other rugs that claim to be “hand-made,” such as “hand-tufted,” but this is a marketing tactic and not an authentic hand-made technique.) Hand-knotted rugs are almost always more expensive than hand-woven, as their production process is longer and more complex. They have finer details, are made of better wool (it's length must allow for pile and excess to clip off) and require more skilled artisans. Weaving a hand-knotted rug requires a great deal of skill and often a lot of time to produce. The quality, and very often cost of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch. In this case a higher density means better quality. A complex pattern can require very dense knotting and thus it can take a long time to produce. An average weaver can tie about 10,000 knots per day. So you can imagine time it can take to complete one rug, especially if it happens to be a large one. The time involved in making it also accounts for hand-knotted rugs costing more on average.

Persian Hand-Knotted

Antique Senneh rugs are one of the most distinctive of all Persian Rugs. Even though the designs are often copied by Bidjar Rugs and Tabriz Rugs but just touching the rugs. Antique Senneh rugs use very tightly spun fine mountain wool. The pile is wondrously silky but the back is scratchy so much so that people compare the backs to sandpaper. Once you eel it it it is unmistakable thereafter. Antique Senneh rugs are fine and durable and are one of the most appreciated rugs by people who know Persian rugs. Senneh rugs are made in Sanandaj, formerly known as Senneh, the capital city of the province of Kurdistan in northwest of Iran. Ironically, the asymmetrical knot also known as Persian or Senneh knot was named after this city even though the symmetrical (Turkish) knot is the type of knot frequently used in Senneh rugs. Senneh weavers tend to weave mostly smaller rugs as well as runners, high quality kelims, and saddlebags. It is unfortunate that only a limited number of these fine rugs are now made and reach the market. These rugs are made in villages as well as workshops. The foundation is almost always cotton and the pile wool, with the exception of some antique rugs which have silk foundations.
Senneh Hand-Knotted
Persian Heriz Wool Hand-Knotted
Indian Hand-Knotted
Afghan Hand-Knotted
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian Antique Tabriz
Persian Naeen Wool and Silk Hand-Knotted
Categories
817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2016. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
Hand-knotted and hand-woven rugs are both made by hand, however, they each employ a unique weaving technique that affects their quality, texture, design complexity and price. (There are other rugs that claim to be “hand-made,” such as “hand-tufted,” but this is a marketing tactic and not an authentic hand-made technique.) Hand-knotted rugs are almost always more expensive than hand-woven, as their production process is longer and more complex. They have finer details, are made of better wool (it's length must allow for pile and excess to clip off) and require more skilled artisans. Weaving a hand-knotted rug requires a great deal of skill and often a lot of time to produce. The quality, and very often cost of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch. In this case a higher density means better quality. A complex pattern can require very dense knotting and thus it can take a long time to produce. An average weaver can tie about 10,000 knots per day. So you can imagine time it can take to complete one rug, especially if it happens to be a large one. The time involved in making it also accounts for hand-knotted rugs costing more on average.

Persian Hand-Knotted

Antique Senneh rugs are one of the most distinctive of all Persian Rugs. Even though the designs are often copied by Bidjar Rugs and Tabriz Rugs but just touching the rugs. Antique Senneh rugs use very tightly spun fine mountain wool. The pile is wondrously silky but the back is scratchy so much so that people compare the backs to sandpaper. Once you eel it it it is unmistakable thereafter. Antique Senneh rugs are fine and durable and are one of the most appreciated rugs by people who know Persian rugs. Senneh rugs are made in Sanandaj, formerly known as Senneh, the capital city of the province of Kurdistan in northwest of Iran. Ironically, the asymmetrical knot also known as Persian or Senneh knot was named after this city even though the symmetrical (Turkish) knot is the type of knot frequently used in Senneh rugs. Senneh weavers tend to weave mostly smaller rugs as well as runners, high quality kelims, and saddlebags. It is unfortunate that only a limited number of these fine rugs are now made and reach the market. These rugs are made in villages as well as workshops. The foundation is almost always cotton and the pile wool, with the exception of some antique rugs which have silk foundations.
Senneh Hand-Knotted
Persian Heriz Wool Hand-Knotted
Indian Hand-Knotted
Afghan Hand-Knotted
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian Antique Tabriz
Persian Naeen Wool and Silk Hand-Knotted
Categories
817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2016. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
Hand-knotted and hand-woven rugs are both made by hand, however, they each employ a unique weaving technique that affects their quality, texture, design complexity and price. (There are other rugs that claim to be “hand-made,” such as “hand-tufted,” but this is a marketing tactic and not an authentic hand-made technique.) Hand-knotted rugs are almost always more expensive than hand-woven, as their production process is longer and more complex. They have finer details, are made of better wool (it's length must allow for pile and excess to clip off) and require more skilled artisans. Weaving a hand-knotted rug requires a great deal of skill and often a lot of time to produce. The quality, and very often cost of a hand-knotted carpet is determined by the number of knots per square inch. In this case a higher density means better quality. A complex pattern can require very dense knotting and thus it can take a long time to produce. An average weaver can tie about 10,000 knots per day. So you can imagine time it can take to complete one rug, especially if it happens to be a large one. The time involved in making it also accounts for hand-knotted rugs costing more on average.

Persian Hand-

Knotted

Antique Senneh rugs are one of the most distinctive of all Persian Rugs. Even though the designs are often copied by Bidjar Rugs and Tabriz Rugs but just touching the rugs. Antique Senneh rugs use very tightly spun fine mountain wool. The pile is wondrously silky but the back is scratchy so much so that people compare the backs to sandpaper. Once you eel it it it is unmistakable thereafter. Antique Senneh rugs are fine and durable and are one of the most appreciated rugs by people who know Persian rugs. Senneh rugs are made in Sanandaj, formerly known as Senneh, the capital city of the province of Kurdistan in northwest of Iran. Ironically, the asymmetrical knot also known as Persian or Senneh knot was named after this city even though the symmetrical (Turkish) knot is the type of knot frequently used in Senneh rugs. Senneh weavers tend to weave mostly smaller rugs as well as runners, high quality kelims, and saddlebags. It is unfortunate that only a limited number of these fine rugs are now made and reach the market. These rugs are made in villages as well as workshops. The foundation is almost always cotton and the pile wool, with the exception of some antique rugs which have silk foundations.
Senneh Hand-Knotted
Persian Heriz Wool Hand-Knotted
Indian Hand-Knotted
Afghan Hand- Knotted
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian Hand-Knotted
Persian Antique
Persian AntiqueTabriz
Persian Naeen Wool and Silk Hand-Knotted
Categories